Songs of the Week

33rd Week of 2019

For readers with access, it takes no effort to notice how music weaves throughout my blog. It was a revelation to find the option of embedding songs from Spotify into WordPress. The unfortunate thing is—and I’ve checked this by switching countries through a VPN—many of the songs that I display are either unavailable in certain countries or the embedded elements simply don’t appear. This makes me sad, even if it usually doesn’t take away from the writing in my posts. Nevertheless, using Spotify has been the easiest way for me to connect my thinking with music because the alternatives suffer their own drawbacks: embedding YouTube videos will also come with country restrictions, visual noise, or less predictable content availability; and purchasing each song individually, then hosting them in WordPress or SoundCloud would carry more cost, labor, and potential legality issues.

That’s a whole lot of preamble for me to get to the point: from time to time, I will drop a Spotify playlist curated by me, Jonathan Oyola a.k.a. Neptune Lazur a.k.a. manfeelings—the last one is my Spotify username and a reference to a Peep Show episode [Dailymotion]. Just like “Reblogs,” “Songs of the Week” posts will have a somewhat buried placement, given none are listed in my website’s menu. I apologize to any viewers who don’t have an automatic way of seeing the embedments on these posts. To the viewers who do, my hope has been that you enjoy these musical offerings or, at the very least, are exposed to lyrics and rhythms which further your own inspiration. People are complex, so it shouldn’t be surprising to find my writing and music tastes can be a little juxtaposed. Here’s the final tip that I’ll leave you with: Spotify users can also *click the logo in the top-right corner of embedments to listen in the app on Android.

I wish you good hunting, good listening, and good writing!

*Update: Sometimes this won’t work from inside the WordPress app. Go figure!

Copyright © 2019 Jonathan Oyola

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Poetry, Reblogs

Boy with a Gun — Too bleak and beautiful

We shared the sidewalk,
and he, too old for lemonade stands,
his head, so resolute it shook,

Boy with a Gun by Too bleak and beautiful

Today, I have the pleasure of reblogging Kat Couch’s poem, “Boy with a Gun“. I’ve been keeping up with Kat’s blog called Too bleak and beautiful for a couple months, and his consistent stream of poetry just blows me away. Please, take a gander at this particular poem, which actually breaks Kat’s more regular convention of communions with Nature; much of his work bears the Zen of haiku in a longer form. As always, direct your comments there instead of here. However, here is my comment that you’ll find there about “Boy with a Gun”: “…I love the casual, slice-of-life flow through a random experience leading into and then trailing the subtly of quite an important message embed in these lines—‘I wanted to say,/ that isn’t the way it is at all.’”

Copyright © 2019 Jonathan Oyola

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Poetry

Half-hourglass Frustration

Unraveled wire-clothing-hanger.
Yes, a whole bouquet of them
arced into a miniature rake
or such malevolent claw.
Scratching in gradient
inside integuments
inside esophagus
inside the neck
the shoulder
lower back
right hip
a groin
thigh
calf
scr-
scra-
scratch
right sole
dominance
and in terrain
an irritant flows.
A mentor’s egress
after the head-to-toe
chalkboard movement.
I must will do something,
something to alibi a feeling
of my failing if I’m to carry on
understanding how it all hangs –

Copyright © 2019 Jonathan Oyola

Image by Justin Martin

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Poetry

Spare Chances

Kāla, the double-minded
murderer of seasons and
mother of spare chances.

She seizes present beings,
and buries them in backyards
where anecdotes serve
the concern of tombstones.
Yet in unison stroke,
she gives birth to new visitors,
or on rarefied occasion—
with a wishy-washiness
typical of some women—
she reincarnates the bygones
into the luscious bodies
of front yard perennials.

What horror and treasure
to see those tender tulpas
cycling through the house.

Copyright © 2019 Jonathan Oyola

Kāla is a word used in Sanskrit to mean “time”. [Wikipedia]

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Poetry

Don’t Feign Death!

An opossum shuffled
to shade under the shed—
Run! Run!
Go now!
and don’t feign death!
There’s trouble, hear me,
there’s poison in the alcove!
The choice should be clear
in this matter of you
pitter-pattering.

Listen! the groundskeeper
lurks and is very outspoken,
scouting often for your kind,
erupting from his house.
He’d sooner see you
foam at the mouth!
Or smite your hide,
wringing soul from fur,
then feed your husk
to the wooded dumpster.

That ruin would be
an unchaste waste
of marsupial life.
I, a casual viewer,
have seen such gore before,
so I implore:
Run! Run!
Go now!
and don’t feign death!
Abandon the shade of shed!

— — — — —
Are you gone?
Are you there?
Oh dear, what may be
if opossum speech
came naturally.

Copyright © 2019 Jonathan Oyola

Image by Rebecca Kriz

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Poetry, Reblogs

This is Not a Love Poem — Ill-Defined

Let’s skip the loving, can’t we?
I want to hurt from loving you, I want
My insides carved out from loving you,

This is Not a Love Poem by Ill-Defined

These are the first three lines from Greer Dellinger’s poem, “This is Not a Love Poem“. As I do with reblogs, I’ve shared just a portion of their writing and disabled comments on this post, so please, show Greer some love by visiting their blog, Ill-Defined. This is definitely not the only intriguing piece that they have written, and I’m deeply curious about all their future ideas. For now, here is what I had to say about “This is Not a Love Poem”: “I liked your poem a couple days ago, and rereading it, I still very much enjoy it. It’s an anti-love poem, yet it leaves room to suspect that there is actually quite a lot of love within the narrator (you?) who is simply defining love through the half-glass-empty methodology.”

Copyright © 2019 Jonathan Oyola

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Poetry

four haiku

summer loving -
     crickets sing with two
          moving legs

■ ■ ■

slow growth
     for grass among weeds -
          the silent battle

■ ■ ■

frequent rain
     reigning over pigeons
          until the coup!

■ ■ ■

the branch gave
     way to aging heat -
          ground food

■ ■ ■

These are some further attempts at haiku. Are they decent? Are they duds? A mix of both? Please, leave a comment, so I can tell the difference. Or at least let me know which one, if any, is your favorite. What does this particular poem have you thinking about?

Thank you in advance.

Copyright © 2019 Jonathan Oyola

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